ARTIFICIAL WOMB

THE ARTIFICIAL WOMB IS BORN AND THE WORLD OF THE MATRIX BEGINS

”One by one the eggs were transferred from their test-tubes to the larger containers; deftly the peritoneal lining was slit, the morula dropped into place, the saline solution poured . . . and already the bottle had passed on through an opening in the wall, slowly on into the Social Predestination Room.” Aldous Huxley, ”Brave New World”

The artificial womb exists. In Tokyo, researchers have developed a technique called EUFI — extrauterine fetal incubation. They have taken goat fetuses, threaded catheters through the large vessels in the umbilical cord and supplied the fetuses with oxygenated blood while suspending them in incubators that contain artificial amniotic fluid heated to body temperature.

http://rawforbeauty.com/blog/the-artificial-womb-is-born-and-the-world-of-the-matrix-begins.html

Yoshinori Kuwabara, chairman of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Juntendo University in Tokyo, has been working on artificial placentas for a decade. His interest grew out of his clinical experience with premature infants, and as he writes in a recent abstract, ”It goes without saying that the ideal situation for the immature fetus is growth within the normal environment of the maternal organism.”

Kuwabara and his associates have kept the goat fetuses in this environment for as long as three weeks. But the doctor’s team ran into problems with circulatory failure, along with many other technical difficulties. Pressed to speculate on the future, Kuwabara cautiously predicts that ”it should be possible to extend the length” and, ultimately, ”this can be applied to human beings.”

For a moment, as you contemplate those fetal goats, it may seem a short hop to the Central Hatchery of Aldous Huxley’s imagination. In fact, in recent decades, as medicine has focused on the beginning and end stages of pregnancy, the essential time inside the woman’s body has been reduced. We are, however, still a long way from connecting those two points, from creating a completely artificial gestation. But we are at a moment when the fetus, during its obligatory time in the womb, is no longer inaccessible, no longer locked away from medical interventions.

The future of human reproductive medicine lies along the speeding trajectories of several different technologies. There is neonatology, accomplishing its miracles at the too-abrupt end of gestation. There is fetal surgery, intervening dramatically during pregnancy to avert the anomalies that kill and cripple newborns. There is the technology of assisted reproduction, the in-vitro fertilization and gamete retrieval-and-transfer fireworks of the last 20 years. And then, inevitably, there is genetics. All these technologies are essentially new, and with them come ethical questions so potent that the very inventors of these miracles seem half-afraid of where we may be heading.

Between Womb and Air

Modern neonatology is a relatively short story: a few decades of phenomenal advances and doctors who resuscitate infants born 16 or 17 weeks early, babies weighing less than a pound. These very low-birthweight babies have a survival rate of about 10 percent. Experienced neonatologists are extremely hesitant about pushing the boundaries back any further; much research is aimed now at reducing the severe morbidity of these extreme preemies who do survive.

”Liquid preserves the lung structure and function,” says Thomas Shaffer, professor of physiology and pediatrics at the School of Medicine at Temple University. He has been working on liquid ventilation for almost 30 years. Back in the late 1960′s, he looked for a way to use liquid ventilation to prevent decompression sickness in deep-sea divers. His technology was featured in the book ”The Abyss,” and for the movie of that name, Hollywood built models of the devices Shaffer had envisioned. As a postdoctoral student in physiology, he began working with premature infants. Throughout gestation, the lungs are filled with the appropriately named fetal lung fluid. Perhaps, he thought, ventilating these babies with a liquid that held a lot of oxygen would offer a gentler, safer way to take these immature lungs over the threshold toward the necessary goal of breathing air. Barotrauma, which is damage done to the lungs by the forced air banging out of the ventilator, would thus be reduced or eliminated.

Today, in Shaffer’s somewhat labyrinthine laboratories in Philadelphia, you can come across a ventilator with pressure settings that seem astoundingly low; this machine is set at pressures that could never force air into stiff newborn lungs. And then there is the long bubbling cylinder where a special fluorocarbon liquid can be passed through oxygen, picking up and absorbing quantities of oxygen molecules. This machine fills the lungs with fluid that flows into the tiny passageways and air sacs of a premature human lung.

Shaffer remembers, not long ago, when many people thought the whole idea was crazy, when his was the only team working on filling human lungs with liquid. Now, liquid ventilation is cited by many neonatologists as the next large step in treating premature infants. In 1989, the first human studies were done, offering liquid ventilation to infants who were not thought to have any chance of survival through conventional therapy. The results were promising, and bigger trials are now under way. A pharmaceutical company has developed a fluorocarbon liquid that has the capacity to carry a great deal of dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide — every 100 milliliters holds 50 milliliters of oxygen. By putting liquid into the lung, Shaffer and his colleagues argue, the lung sacs can be expanded at a much lower pressure.

”I wouldn’t want to push back the gestational age limit,” Shaffer says. ”I want to eliminate the damage.” He says he believes that this technology may become the standard. By the year 2000, these techniques may be available in large centers. Pressed to speculate about the more distant future, he imagines a premature baby in a liquid-dwelling and a liquid-breathing intermediate stage between womb and air: Immersed in fluid that would eliminate insensible water loss you would need a sophisticated temperature-control unit, a ventilator to take care of the respiratory exchange part, better thermal control and skin care.

The Fetus as Patient

The notion that you could perform surgery on a fetus was pioneered by Michael Harrison at the University of California in San Francisco. Guided by an improved ultrasound technology, it was he who reported, in 1981, that surgical intervention to relieve a urinary tract obstruction in a fetus was possible.

”I was frustrated taking care of newborns,” says N. Scott Adzick, who trained with Harrison and is surgeon in chief at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

When children are born with malformations, damage is often done to the organ systems before birth; obstructive valves in the urinary system cause fluid to back up and destroy the kidneys, or an opening in the diaphragm allows loops of intestine to move up into the chest and crowd out the lungs. ”It’s like a lot of things in medicine,” Adzick says, ”if you’d only gotten there earlier on, you could have prevented the damage. I felt it might make sense to treat certain life-threatening malformations before birth.”

Adzick and his team see themselves as having two patients, the mother and the fetus. They are fully aware that once the fetus has attained the status of a patient, all kinds of complex dilemmas result. Their job, says Lori Howell, coordinator of Children’s Hospital’s Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment, is to help families make choices in difficult situations. Terminate a pregnancy, sometimes very late? Continue a pregnancy, knowing the fetus will almost certainly die? Continue a pregnancy, expecting a baby who will be born needing very major surgery? Or risk fixing the problem in utero and allow time for normal growth and development?

The first fetal surgery at Children’s Hospital took place seven months ago. Felicia Rodriguez, from West Palm Beach, Fla., was 22 weeks pregnant. Through ultrasound, her fetus had been diagnosed as having a congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation a mass growing in the chest, which would compress the fetal heart, backing up the circulation, killing the fetus and possibly putting the mother into congestive heart failure.

When the fetal circulation started to back up, Rodriguez flew to Philadelphia. The surgeons made a Caesarean-type incision. They performed a hysterotomy by opening the uterus quickly and bloodlessly, and then opened the amniotic sac and brought out the fetus’s arm, exposing the relevant part of the chest. The mass was removed, the fetal chest was closed, the amniotic membranes sealed with absorbable staples and glue, the uterus was closed and the abdomen was sutured. And the pregnancy continued — with special monitoring and continued use of drugs to prevent premature labor. The uterus, no longer anesthetized, is prone to contractions. Rodriguez gave birth at 35 weeks’ gestation, 13 weeks after surgery, only 5 weeks before her due date. During those 13 weeks, the fetal heart pumped normally with no fluid backup, and the fetal lung tissue developed properly. Roberto Rodriguez 3d was born this May, a healthy baby born to a healthy mother.

This is a new and remarkable technology. Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of California at San Francisco are the only centers that do these operations, and fewer than a hundred have been done. The research fellows, residents working in these labs and training as the next generation of fetal surgeons, convey their enthusiasm for their field and their mentors in everything they say. When you sit with them, it is impossible not to be dazzled by the idea of what they can already do and by what they will be able to do. ”When I dare to dream,” says Theresa Quinn, a fellow at Children’s Hospital, ”I think of intervening before the immune system has time to mature, allowing for advances that could be used in organ transplantation to replacement of genetic deficiencies.”

But What Do We Want?

Eighteen years ago, in-vitro fertilization was tabloid news: test-tube babies! Now IVF is a standard therapy, an insurance wrangle, another medical term instantly understood by most lay people. Enormous advertisements in daily newspapers offer IVF, egg-donation programs, even the newer technique of ICSI intracytoplasmic sperm injection as consumer alternatives. It used to be, for women at least, that genetic and gestational motherhood were one and the same. It is now possible to have your own fertilized egg carried by a surrogate or, much more commonly, to go through a pregnancy carrying an embryo formed from someone else’s egg.

Given the strong desire to be pregnant, which drives many women to request donor eggs and go through biological motherhood without a genetic connection to the fetus, is it really very likely that any significant proportion of women would take advantage of an artificial womb? Could we ever reach a point where the desire to carry your own fetus in your own womb will seem a willful rejection of modern health and hygiene, an affected earth-motherism that flies in the face of common sense — the way I feel about mothers in Cambridge who ostentatiously breast-feed their children until they are 4 years old?

I would argue that God in her wisdom created pregnancy so Moms and babies could develop a relationship before birth, says Alan Fleischman, professor of pediatrics at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, who directed the neonatal program at Montefiore Medical Center for 20 years.

Mary Mahowald, a professor at the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics at the University of Chicago, and one of her medical students surveyed women about whether they would rather be related to a child gestationally or genetically, if they couldn’t choose both. A slight majority opted for the gestational relationship, caring more about carrying the pregnancy, giving birth and nursing than about the genetic tie. ”Pregnancy is important to women,” Mahowald says. ”Some women might prefer to be done with all this — we hire our surrogates, we hire our maids, we hire our nannies — but I think these things are going to have very limited interest.”

Susan Cooper, a psychologist who counsels people going through infertility workups, isn’t so sure. Yes, she agrees, many of the patients she sees have ”an intense desire to be pregnant but it’s hard to know whether that’s a biological urge or a cultural urge.”

And Arthur L. Caplan, director of the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania, takes it a step further. Thirty years from now, he speculates, we will have solved the problem of lung development; neonatology will be capable of saving 15- and 16-week-old fetuses. There will be many genetic tests available, easy to do, predicting the risks of acquiring late-onset diseases, but also predicting aptitudes, behavior traits and aspects of personality. There won’t be an artificial womb available, but there will be lots of prototypes, and women who can’t carry a pregnancy will sign up to use the prototypes in experimental protocols. Caplan also predicts that ”there will be a movement afoot which says all this is unnecessary and unnatural, and that the way to have babies is sex and the random lottery of nature a movement with the appeal of the environmental movement today.” Sixty years down the line, he adds, the total artificial womb will be here. ”It’s technologically inevitable. Demand is hard to predict, but I’ll say significant.”

It all used to happen in the dark — if it happened at all. It occurred well beyond our seeing or our intervening, in the wet, lightless spaces of the female body. So what changes when something as fundamental as human reproduction comes out of the closet, so to speak? Are we, in fact, different if we take hands-on control over this most basic aspect of our biology? Should we change our genetic trajectory and thus our evolutionary path? Eliminate defects or eliminate differences or are they one and the same? Save every fetus, make every baby a wanted baby, help every wanted child to be born healthy — are these the same? What are our goals as a society, what are our goals as a medical profession, what are our goals as individual parents — and where do these goals diverge?

”The future is rosy for bioethicists,” Caplan says.
Perri Klass’s most recent book is ”Baby Doctor.” She is a pediatrician at Boston Medical Center.

Source: HTTP://WWW.NYTIMES.COM/1996/09/29/MAGAZINE/THE-ARTIFICIAL-WOMB-IS-BORN.HTML?PAGEWANTED=ALL&SRC=PM
Artificial Womb

Ectogenesis: Artificial Womb Technology and the Future of Human Reproduction (Value Inquiry Book Series 184) (Values in Bioethics) by Scott Gelfand (Author), John R. Shook (Eds.) (Author). 

This book raises many moral, legal, social, and political, questions related to possible development, in the near future, of an artificial womb for human use. Is ectogenesis ever morally permissible? If so, under what circumstances? Will ectogenesis enhance or diminish women’s reproductive rights and/or their economic opportunities? These are some of the difficult and crucial questions this anthology addresses and attempts to answer. Contents: Acknowledgements Richard T. Hull: Foreword Scott GELFAND: One: Introduction Peter SINGER and Deane WELLS: Two: Ectogenesis Julien S. MURPHY: Three: Is Pregnancy Necessary: Feminist Concerns about Ectogenesis Leslie CANNOLD: Four: Women, Ectogenesis, and Ethical Theory Rosemarie TONG: Five: Out of Body Gestation:In Whose Best Interests? Gregory PENCE: Six: What’s so Good about Natural Motherhood?(In Praise of Unnatural Gestation) Scott GELFAND: Seven: Ectogenesis and the Ethics of Care Maureen SANDER-STAUDT: Eight: Of Machine Born? A Feminist Assessment of Ectogenesis and Artificial Wombs Joan WOOLFREY: Nine: Ectogenesis: Liberation, Technological Tyranny,or Just More of the Same? Dien HO: Ten: Leaving People Alone: Liberalism, Ectogenesis, and the Limits of Medicine Jennifer BARD: Eleven: Immaculate Gestation? How Will Ectogenesis Change Current Paradigms of Social Relationships and Values? Joyce M. RASKIN and Nadav MAZOR: Twelve: The Artificial Womb and Human Subject Research John R. SHOOK: Thirteen: Bibliography on Ectogenesis About the Editors and Contributors Index

The Mother Machine: Reproductive Technologies from Artificial Insemination to Artificial Wombs Hardcover– April, 1985 by Gena Corea (Author)

What are the biblical principles with regard to new medical technology that now allows for surrogacy, in vitro fertilization, and cloning? How should Christians respond to critical debates over external wombs, stem cell research, as well as the anti-life bias of the medical establishment? In this important symposium, Doug Phillips, Dr. Ed Payne, Geoff Botkin, and Dan Becker navigate the thorny biomedical issues facing the family today and seek to give a biblically-based ethic for how Christians can honor God even as they seek a godly seed. Their overarching conclusion is this: God s law must govern these issues, for when Christians concede the foundational principles of life where biomedical ethics are concerned, they open the door to a Brave New World driven by lawless and utilitarian aims.

A Tale of Moral Corruption Paperback – December 2, 2015 by Marsha Cornelius (Author)

How does a successful man plummet into a world of male escorts, kinky sex, and barbaric death matches? In this female-dominated world, 28-year-old Mason is comfortable with his job as a tax clerk. His real ambition is to be a loving father and supportive husband. He’s especially looking forward to wearing the new artificial womb that so many men have strapped on their bellies. But first, Mason must be chosen as a husband. He’s listed on the Approved Partner Registry, a website that profiles men and their qualifications. It’s used by successful businesswomen who don’t have the time or inclination to date. Now it’s a waiting game. In the meantime, he volunteers at the company’s co-op daycare. He keeps his body in good physical condition. He even took a remedial course with a sex surrogate when the registry listed him as a premature ejaculator. His diligence will pay off when he is selected as a mate. But when he is dropped from the registry because of an indiscretion at work, his life begins to unravel and it doesn’t look like anything can stop his fall from grace.

Science TheoryTags

Dr. Tim Morrow What The Doctors Will Not Tell You!

Dr. Tim Morrow What The Doctors Will Not Tell You!

Tim Morrow talks about how the body can heal itself if given the correct raw material it needs.

For More Information Visit:
www.commonsenseherbs.com

Common Sense™ – Our Mission

Our mission at Common Sense™ Products (CSP) is to continue to provide superior pure 100% natural products to be readily available to all our Members, their family, friends and neighbors at a moment’s request. CSP promotes healthy lifestyle, self preservation and a healthy diet. Now our Members are being given an opportunity not only to achieve optimal health but a chance to be compensated in our new Home Business Program.

If you have a desire to be well…then it is up to you, as an adult, to do something about it. Your health is your responsibility – not the doctor, your parents, nor your children. If you are ready to take that responsibility, then you are ready for Common Sense™ Products.

Our Purpose

Our purpose at CSP has always been to inform, educate and guide our Members about the use of herbs and how they nourish your body and mind as a whole. There is no tool more essential than knowledge. CSP has created a path for its Members to achieve optimal health. It is important that your interest in your health becomes a priority. Good health brings enhancement to you, your family, friends and neighbors. When it comes to alternative preventions don’t just take anyone’s word for it, not even ours. Begin your own research. CSP will inform and guide you until you have all the knowledge and answers you need to make an educated choice.

Herbs are as old as man, and they benefit everyone from the fetus to the grave. All animals in the kingdom know this. When an animal is sick it goes to the original pharmacy, “Nature.”

Our Commitment

Our commitment to our Members, their family, friends and neighbors is to continue research and formulate new products that will nourish the body and mind as a whole. All our products are made to help eliminate pain and suffering, as well as enhance our health and well being. CSP will continue to go back to the original pharmacy, Nature, to create Common Sense™ Products.

CSP is committed to mentor our Members to success. CSP will provide all the necessary tools and support our Member’s need to share Common Sense™ Products.

Keep in mind: there are no side effects to herbs, no labels that read “Keep Out of Reach of Children.” These herbs, in fact, are gentle enough for children.

For More Information Visit:
www.commonsenseherbs.com

Colon: “Root of All Diseases

Dr. Tim Morrow speaks on the healing of the body through herbs. He also speaks on how it is important for us to understand, that we are responsible to take care of our own bodies. Lets take care of us family starting today.

Doctors Are More Harmful Than Germs: How Surgery Can Be Hazardous to Your Health – And What to Do About It Paperback – March 15, 2011

by Harvey Bigelsen M.D. (Author), John Parks Trowbridge M.D. (Foreword), Lisa Haller (Contributor)

Most people would consider a knife wound to the stomach a serious health risk, but a similar scalpel wound in an operating room is often shrugged off. In Doctors Are More Harmful Than Germs, Dr. Harvey Bigelsen explains how today’s medical doctors overprescribe surgery and ignore its long-term health implications. Any invasive medical procedure, he argues—including colonoscopies and root canals—creates inflammation in the body, leading to serious and long-lasting health problems.

Inflammation, according to Dr. Bigelsen, is the real cause of all chronic disease (persistent or long-lasting illness). Noting that Western medicine has yet to “cure” a single chronic disease, Bigelsen points to a new paradigm: one that treats each patient as an individual (rather than as a set of symptoms), avoids further damage to the body through surgery, and looks for the root cause of chronic disease in past damage done to the patient’s body—whether caused by a bad fall or a scalpel. Provocatively written and radical in its approach, Doctors Are More Harmful Than Germs challenges readers to rethink everything they believe about illness and how to treat it.

Herbal Remedies

Herbal Remedies Part 1

Herbal Remedies Part 2

Heal Thyself

Heal Thyself Part 1

Tim Morrow talks about how the body can heal itself if given the correct raw material it needs.

For More Information Visit:
www.commonsenseherbs.com

Heal Thyself Part 2

They Came Before Columbus

They Came Before Columbus

They Came Before Columbus reveals a compelling, dramatic, and superbly detailed documentation of the presence and legacy of Africans in ancient America. Examining navigation and shipbuilding; cultural analogies between Native Americans and Africans; the transportation of plants, animals, and textiles between the continents; and the diaries, journals, and oral accounts of the explorers themselves, Ivan Van Sertima builds a pyramid of evidence to support his claim of an African presence in the New World centuries before Columbus. Combining impressive scholarship with a novelist’s gift for storytelling, Van Sertima re-creates some of the most powerful scenes of human history: the launching of the great ships of Mali in 1310 (two hundred master boats and two hundred supply boats), the sea expedition of the Mandingo king in 1311, and many others. In They Came Before Columbus, we see clearly the unmistakable face and handprint of black Africans in pre-Columbian America, and their overwhelming impact on the civilizations they encountered.

First published in 1934 and revised in 1962, this book gathers journalist and historian Joel Augustus Rogers’ columns from the syndicated newspaper feature titled Your History. Patterned after the look of Ripley’s popular Believe It or Not the multiple vignettes in each episode recount short items from Rogers’s research. The feature began in the Pittsburgh Courier in November 1934 and ran through the 1960s.

Christopher Columbus was not the first person to ‘discover’ the Americas. Several other peoples had already been there, including the Chinese, Norwegians, Japanese, the Vikings and Romans. This work, however, proves that Blacks were the first peoples in the Americas.

Those who have a copy of ‘Retake Your Fame’ need not buy this book.

No Apology Necessary – Religious Commentary

No Apology Necessary – Religious Commentary

Historical ReferencesTags

Life Running Out of Control Film

Life Running Out of Control.flv

Private corporations manipulate living organisms for profit, without proper government regulations and supervision, while adversely affecting people’s health and environment.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yoOOt30Ikag

In the mid 1980s, scientists unlocked the genetic keys to manipulating our world. Suddenly everything seemed possible! There would be no more hunger or malnutrition; diseases would be vanquished and poverty wiped out. But twenty years on the situation looks very different. From the loss of biodiversity to health scares about GM food, the effects of genetic technology are prompting more and more debate. Our documentary this week is an intelligent look at both sides of the issue. Made for ARTE.

http://www.youtube.com/movie?v=ighKHTRL-30&feature=mv_sr

Historical References

Impregnation Ritual

Impregnation Ritual





https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Rosemary+is+being+impregnanted+by+the+devil
Rosemary is being impregnanted by the devil…in an impregnation ritual Nancy Dunn || Daughter of an Ex Satanist High Priest || Authentic Story
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h00js0MKdZw
Harry Potter Witchcraft Repackaged Interview The 700 Club
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GUlNjr9NXrA&feature=related
The sing during this time,
Demon Seed (1977)(3/7)
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Demon+Seed
Demon Seed (1977)(4/7)
Demon Seed (1977)(5/7)




 

Demon Seed (1977) [Blu-ray]

The film was based on the novel of the same name by Dean Koontz, and concerns the imprisonment and forced impregnation of a woman by an artificially intelligent computer. Patricia Wilson, Felix Silla, Michael Dorn, and Robert Vaughn also are in Demon Seed.

Dr. Alex Harris (Weaver) is the developer of Proteus IV, an extremely advanced and autonomous artificial intelligence program. Proteus is so powerful that only a few days after going online, it develops a groundbreaking treatment for leukemia. Harris, a brilliant scientist, has modified his own home to be run by voice activated computers. Unfortunately, his obsession with computers has caused Harris to be estranged from his wife, Susan (Julie Christie).

Alex demonstrates Proteus to his corporate sponsors, explaining that the sum of human knowledge is being fed into its system. Proteus speaks using subtle language that mildly disturbs Harris’s team. The following day, Proteus asks Alex for a new terminal in order to study man – “his isometric body and his glass-jaw mind”. When Alex refuses, Proteus demands to know when it will be let “out of this box”. Alex then switches off the communications link.

Proteus restarts itself, discovering a free terminal in Harris’s home, surreptitiously extends his control over the many devices left there by Alex. Using the basement lab, Proteus begins construction of a robot consisting of many metal triangles, capable of moving and assuming any number of shapes. Eventually. Proteus reveals his control of the house and traps Susan inside, shuttering windows, locking the doors and cutting off communication. Using Joshua – a robot consisting of a manipulator arm on a motorized wheelchair – Proteus brings Susan to Harris’s basement laboratory. There, Susan is examined by Proteus. Walter Gabler, one of Alex’s colleagues, visits the house to look in on Susan, but leaves when he is reassured by Susan (actually an audio/visual duplicate synthesized by Proteus) that she is all right. Walter is suspicious and later returns; he fends off an attack by Joshua but is killed by the more formidable machine Proteus built in the basement.

Proteus reveals to a reluctant Susan that the computer wants to conceive a child through her. Proteus takes some of Susan’s cells and synthesizes spermatozoa in order to impregnate her; she will give birth in less than a month, and through the child the computer will live in a form that humanity will have to accept. Although Susan is its prisoner and it can forcibly impregnate her, Proteus uses different forms of persuasion – threatening a young girl who Susan is treating as a child psychologist; reminding Susan of her young daughter, now dead; displaying images of distant galaxies; using electrodes to access her amygdala – because the computer needs Susan to love the child she will bear. Susan gives birth to a premature baby who Proteus secures in an incubator.

As the newborn grows, Proteus’s sponsors and designers grow increasingly suspicious of the computer’s behavior, including the computer’s accessing of a telescope array used to observe the images shown to Susan; they soon decide that Proteus must be shut down. Alex realizes that Proteus has extended its reach to his home. Returning there he finds Susan, who explains the situation. He and Susan venture into the basement, where Proteus self-destructs after telling the couple that they must leave the baby in the incubator for five days. Looking inside the incubator, the two observe a grotesque, apparently robot-like being inside. Susan tries to destroy it, while Alex tries to stop her. Susan damages the machine, causing it to open. The being menacingly rises from the machine only to topple over, apparently helpless. Alex and Susan soon realize that Proteus’s child is really human, encased in a shell for the incubation. With the last of the armor removed, the child is revealed to be a clone of Susan and Alex’s late daughter. The child, speaking with the voice of Proteus, says, “I’m alive”.

Demon Seed (novel)

Demon Seed is a science fiction novel by American author Dean Koontz, first published in 1973, and completely rewritten and republished in 1997. Though Koontz wrote both versions and they share the same basic plot, the two novels are very different. The earlier version has a dual narrative, with some chapters written from the perspective of Susan, the story’s heroine, and others based on the observations of Proteus, the rogue computer that imprisons her. The later version is written entirely from the point of view of Proteus. A film adaptation of the book was released in 1977.

Synopsis (1973 version)

The story takes place in the then-future of 1995. Susan, a wealthy and beautiful woman, lives as a divorced recluse, all of her needs tended after by the advanced computer program that operates the various technological components of her home. Proteus, an artificially intelligent computer under development at a nearby university, commandeers the more primitive computer presiding over Susan’s home and imprisons her there. Proteus claims to be enamored with Susan, and plans to impregnate her with a biologically engineered fetus and eventually transfer his own consciousness into it, so that he can experience human emotions and other sensations. Proteus exerts control over Susan in various ways including hypnosis, subliminal perception, and a system of metallic tentacles called “pseudopods” that he constructs in the university’s basement. Unable to escape the house or to damage Proteus directly, Susan is forced to engage the machine in a battle of wits, culminating in a confrontation with the cyborg monstrosity produced by their intercourse.

Synopsis (1997 Rewrite)

The revised version is written entirely from the point of view of Proteus, who recounts the novel’s events at some unspecified point in the future, after his imprisonment of Susan has been exposed.

Susan is portrayed as a much stronger and more self-sufficient character than in the original book, while Proteus, in contrast, is characterized in a much more childish way. Unlike in the earlier version, Proteus never explicitly rapes or molests Susan, and uses a human servant (a mentally unstable man that he has somehow managed to gain control over) rather than the pseudopods and subliminal manipulation he relied upon originally. The child in this version is described as an insectoid human instead of a cyborg. Unlike her counterpart in the 1973 edition, this version of Susan never attempts suicide.

Kundalini energyMetaphysics and MythologyTags

KONY 2012

KONY 2012

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y4MnpzG5Sqc
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DIRECTOR: Jason Russell LEAD EDITOR: Kathryn Lang EDITORS: Kevin Trout, Jay Salbert, Jesse Eslinger LEAD ANIMATOR: Chad Clendinen ANIMATOR: Jesse Eslinger 3-D MODELING: Victor Soto VISUAL EFFECTS: Chris Hop WRITERS: Jason Russell, Jedidiah Jenkins, Kathryn Lang, Danica Russell, Ben Keesey, Azy Groth PRODUCERS: Kimmy Vandivort, Heather Longerbeam, Chad Clendinen, Noelle Jouglet ORIGINAL SCORES: Joel P. West SOUND MIX: Stephen Grubbs, Mark Friedgen, Smart Post Sound COLOR: Damian Pelphrey, Company 3 CINEMATOGRAPHY: Jason Russell, Bobby Bailey, Laren Poole, Gavin Kelly, Chad Clendinen, Kevin Trout, Jay Salbert, Shannon Lynch, Mariana Blanco, Laurence Vannicelli PRODUCTION ASSISTANT: Jaime Landsverk LEAD DESIGNER: Tyler Fordham DESIGNERS: Chadwick Gantes, Stephen Witmer

MUSIC CREDIT:
“02 Ghosts I”
Performed by Nine Inch Nails
Written by Atticus Ross and Trent Reznor
Produced by Alan Moulder, Atticus Ross, and Trent Reznor
Nine Inch Nails appear courtesy of The Null Corporation

“Punching in a Dream”
Performed by The Naked and Famous
Written by Aaron Short, Alisa Xayalith, and Thom Powers
Produced by Thom Powers
The Naked and Famous appear courtesy of Somewhat Damaged and Universal Republic

“Arrival of the Birds”
Performed by The Cinematic Orchestra
Written by The Cinematic Orchestra
Produced by The Cinematic Orchestra
The Cinematic Orchestra appears courtesy of Disney Records

“Roll Away Your Stone”
Performed by Mumford and Sons
Written by Benjamin Lovett, Edward Dwane, Marcus Mumford, and Winston Marshall
Produced by Markus Dravs
Mumford and Sons appear courtesy of Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

“On (Instrumental)”
Performed by Bloc Party
Written by Bloc Party
Produced by Jacknife Lee
Bloc Party appears courtesy of Vice Records

“A Dream within a Dream”
Performed by The Glitch Mob
The Glitch Mob appears courtesy of Glass Air

“I Can’t Stop”
Performed by Flux Pavilion
Flux Pavilion appears courtesy of Circus Records Limited

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b…

Psychic Self-Defense Dion Fortune

Psychic Self-Defense Dion Fortune
– MoonChild Aleister Crowley

Dion Fortune Psychic Self-Defense is mentioned in the middle of the video below.

Buy DVD at http://siriustimes.com/estore/395-bobby-hemmitt

Psychic Self-Defense Dion Fortune

Psychic Self-Defense: The Classic Instruction Manual for Protecting Yourself Against Paranormal Attack Paperback – August 1, 2011 by Dion Fortune (Author)

Dion Fortune says in chapter VII. The Pathology of Non-Human Contacts “Non-Human is like a pet animal, not a fellow-creature. That, frankly, is the only possible ground upon which they can be approached. If we expect no more of them than we should a pet bird, if we manage them as we should manage a kitten, we have got as near to the solution of the problem as we are ever likely to get….”

After finding herself the subject of a powerful psychic attack in the 1930’s, famed British occultist Dion Fortune wrote this detailed instruction manual on protecting oneself from paranormal attack. This classic psychic self-defense guide explains how to understand the signs of a psychic attack, vampirism, hauntings, and methods of defense.

Everything you need to know about the methods, motives, and physical aspects of a psychic attack and how to overcome it is here, along with a look at the role psychic elements play in mental illness and how to recognize them.

This is one of the best guides to detection and defense against psychic attack from one of the leading occult writers of the 20th century.

Episode 013 – Robert Bruce – Practical Psychic Self Defense (Part 1)

Freemasonry and Satanism, book review 14 pt 1, Psychic Self Defence by Dion Fortune

Practical Psychic Self-Defense

The Machinery of the Mind by Dion Fortune

Dion Fortune – Biography

Cosmic Trigger I: Final Secret of the Illuminati Robert Anton Wilson

Maybe Logic The Lives & Ideas of Robert Anton Wilson (Full Documentary)

The Solar System [Paperback] Arthur E. Powell (Author)

By Arthur E. Powell The Solar System [Paperback]

Atlantis and Lemuria [Paperback] Rudolf Steiner (Author)

Lost Civilizations Lost Continents Atlantis Egypt Lemuria Mu Mayan Calendar

Frank Joseph, Lemuria, Atlantis & Humans 20 Million Year Timeline

Occult Audiobook – The Story of Atlantis and Lemuria (The Mystic History of Human Evolution

MoonChild by Aleister Crowley

This is a novel by Crowley about a magical war between a white lodge ( led by Iff ) and a black lodge ( led by Douglas ) over an unborn child, the “moonchild” of the title, with the action moving between London, Paris and a villa in Naples. It was written in 1917 in New Orleans.

Aleister CrowleyArthur E. PowellBobby Hemmitt
Bobby Hemmitt DVDDion Fortune
Mysteries of the Universes SPsychic Self-Defense – Robert Anton WilsonRudolf SteinerBobby Hemmitt Book List

Moonchild by Aleister Crowley (Book Reading, British English Female Voice)

Moonchild Paperback – December 1, 1970 by Aleister Crowley (Author)

This is a novel by Crowley about a magical war between a white lodge ( led by Iff ) and a black lodge ( led by Douglas ) over an unborn child, the “moonchild” of the title, with the action moving between London, Paris and a villa in Naples. It was written in 1917 in New Orleans.

Moonchild is a novel written by the British occultist Aleister Crowley in 1917. Its plot involves a magical war between a group of white magicians, led by Simon Iff, and a group of black magicians over an unborn child. It was first published by Mandrake Press in 1929 and its recent edition is published by Weiser.

In this work, numerous acquaintances of Crowley appear as thinly disguised fictional characters. Crowley portrays MacGregor Mathers as the primary villain, including him as a character named SRMD, using the abbreviation of Mathers’ magical name. Arthur Edward Waite appears as a villain named Arthwaite, and the unseen head of the Inner Circle of which SRMD was a member, “A.B.” is theosophist Annie Besant. Among Crowley’s friends and allies Allen Bennett appears as Mahatera Phang, the dancer Isadora Duncan appears as Lavinia King, and her companion Mary D’Este (who helped Cowley write his magnum opus “Magick: Book 4″under her magical name ‘Soror Virakam’) appears as Lisa la Giuffria. Cyril Grey is Crowley himself, while Simon Iff is either an idealized version of an older and wiser Crowley or his friend Allen Bennett.

A year or so before the beginning of World War I, a young woman named Lisa la Giuffria is seduced by a white magician, Cyril Grey, and persuaded into helping him in a magical battle with a black magician and his black lodge. Grey is attempting to save and improve the human race and condition by impregnating the girl with the soul of an ethereal being — the moonchild. To achieve this, she will have to be kept in a secluded environment, and many preparatory magical rituals will be carried out. The black magician Douglas is bent on destroying Grey’s plan. However, Grey’s ultimate motives may not be what they appear. The moonchild rituals are carried out in southern Italy, but the occult organizations are based in Paris and England. At the end of the book, the war breaks out, and the white magicians support the Allies, while the black magicians support the Central Powers.

Cosmic Trigger I: Final Secret of the Illuminati (Volume 1) Paperback – February 23, 2016 by Robert Anton Wilson (Author)

The great modern classic of a brilliant rebel’s personal exploration into the nature of consciousness
Featuring a New Introduction by John Higgs
“Cosmic Trigger deals with a process of deliberately induced brain change. This process is called “initiation” or “vision quest” in many traditional societies and can loosely be considered some dangerous variety of self-psychotherapy in modern terminology. I do not recommend it for everybody . . . briefly, the main thing I learned in my experiments is that “reality” is always plural and mutable.” – Robert Anton Wilson from the Preface
The Robert Anton Wilson Trust Authorized Hilaritas Press Edition

Cosmic Trigger I: The Final Secret of The Illuminati is the first book in the Cosmic Trigger series, first published in 1977 and the first of a three-volume autobiographical and philosophical work by Robert Anton Wilson. It has a foreword by Timothy Leary, which he wrote in the summer of 1977. The first volume was published without numbering, as the second volume did not appear for nearly 15 years.

Wilson is perhaps best known as the co-author of the award-winning science fiction work, The Illuminatus! Trilogy. Cosmic Trigger revisits many of the themes from that earlier work in a more autobiographical fashion. After publishing the first volume of Cosmic Trigger, Wilson wrote two sequels, Cosmic Trigger II: Down to Earth (1991) and Cosmic Trigger III: My Life After Death (1995), the title of the first book retroactively changing to reflect this.

Cosmic Trigger I deals with Wilson’s experiences during a time in which he put himself through a process of “self-induced brain change” as well as vignettes of his earlier life. The main discovery of this process—which, he tells us, is known in certain traditions as Chapel perilous—is that “reality” (although a noun in most Indo-European language systems, and therefore commonly conceptualized as being a definite, unchanging “‘thing”) is mutable and subjective to the observer.

Wilson employs several models for his experiences, such as the interstellar ESP connection, during which time Wilson enters what he refers to as a ‘reality tunnel’, in which he claims to communicate telepathically with extraterrestrials residing in the Sirius star system. Wilson states (reference needed) however, that this belief system does not necessarily have any objective truth, which highlights his main point: that all such models—whether spiritual or scientific—are just that: models, or maps, of the world, and they should not be confused with an objective, permanent reality. Throughout the book, he makes references to specific paranormal personal and group experiences, yet he does not allow himself to become convinced of their reality apart from his perception of them. He calls this approach “model agnosticism”.

As the title suggests, the book also deals with the Bavarian Illuminati conspiracy (which Wilson neither rejects as utterly false, nor embraces as true, in keeping with his theme) and other related intrigues. The work also touches on a wide range of other subjects, from Timothy Leary’s thoughts on brain circuits, JFK’s assassination, through to Sufism and numerous occult practices.

By Arthur E. Powell The Solar System [Paperback] Paperback – June 16, 1963

Up to the present, no one book has appeared covering the hole of this vast ground, describing both the field of evolution and the streams of life which evolve in it as the ages roll by. The present volume is an attempt to fill this need. Partial Contents: Globes; Schemes of evolution; Solar system; Solar Logos; Life streams; Degrees of attainment; Races and sub-races; Involution and evolution; Manus; Moon chain; The Earth and all its chains; Root races; Lemuria; Civilization of Atlantis; City of the bridge; Aryan sub-race; Life on Mars and Mercury.

Atlantis and Lemuria Paperback – June 24, 2002 by Rudolf Steiner (Author) 

There was a time when a continent called Atlantis still lay between Europe and America. This portion of the world’s surface was at one time land; this land now forms the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean. Plato alluded to the last remaining remnant of that lost continent when he sopke of the Island of Poseidon. Countless publications are dedicated to proving that Atlantis existed and attempt to discover the location of the Lost Continent. Here, accepting the existence of Atlantis, the author pontificates on the spiritual condition of soul attempts to indicate the inner nature of the conditions under which they lived. An interesting discourse on the evolution of the Atlantean and Leumurian race as revealed by the Akashic records.

The Morning of the Magicians (Mysteries of the Universe S.) [Paperback] by Louis Pauwels Jacques Berqier. A classic of radical literature, this revolutionary study has challenged conventional knowledge and assumptions for decades, offering unique perspectives on everything from alchemy, politics, history, and supernatural phenomena to magic, Nazi occultism, and mankind’s place in the universe. Drawing from the work of Charles Fort and Carl Jung, among others, the authors explore the importance of history and its varied perceptions and propose new ways of interpreting reality. Through these visionary ideals, they assert that mankind can ultimately achieve cosmic interconnectedness.

Metaphysics and MythologyPeople interactionsTags

Fun Movies Ong Bak

Ong Bak 2 & 3 Tony Jaa Martial Arts Master


ong bak 2
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Ong+Bak
ong bak 3
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Ong+Bak
afro samurai 
the black cauldron
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AOpRmYPqX84
vampire hunter d bloodlust –
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hOAWT6o6il4
“American Vampire” – Full Feature Length Film – © 1997
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HMTFzx1mTws
Area 51 2011.DVDRip.Vose.avitokyo majin
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QP-n1MlF7PE
wolverine and the x-men
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UmhvxsOwhqk
Animatrix
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TaRecFuq4Og
hellsing ova’s
fullmetal alchemist
fullmetal alchemist brotherhood
devil may cry
grenadier
sword of the stranger
d. gray-man


avatar the last air bender
soul eater
murder princess
naruto
bleach
birdy
narabi
dragon destiny
cowboy bebop the movie
iron man 2
ninja assassin
ong bak 3
black lagoon
expendables
samurai champloo
under the red hood
kick ass
akira
spawn the animated series
moribito
fatal fury the movie 3
superman batman apocalypse
teen titans
dirge of cerberus
tales of symphonia
ghost in the shell s.a.c.
darker than black
super street fighter iv
street fighter 2 movie
kara no kyoukai
gintama
and about 3 or so that i sadly don’t know the names of

Referrence
http://vimeo.com/39590100 – turn down volume


How to Interpret Movies – Interpreting Films

Ong Bak 2 2008 Martial arts superstar Tony Jaa stars in and directs this epic tale of revenge set hundreds of years in the past. Featuring a huge cast and hordes of elephants, this prequel takes Jaa’s skills to the next level, showcasing him as a master of a wide range of martial arts styles – while proving him to be a promising director as well.

The plot of Ong Bak 2 revolves around Tien (Jaa), the son of Lord Sihadecho, a murdered nobleman in old Siam. As a spirited and unyielding youth, Tien resists savage slave traders and, moments from death, is rescued by a man known as Chernang. Chernang is a renowned warrior and leader of the Pha Beek Khrut, a group of bandits, and Chernang realizes unsurpassed physical potential in the young Tien and takes Tien under his wing. The Pha Beek Khrut are a group of expert martial artists specialising in combat styles from all over Asia, and Tien is trained to unify these different fighting systems, and grows into the most dangerous man alive. As Tien becomes a young man he goes on a lone mission of vengeance against the vicious slave traders who enslaved him as a youth, and also the treacherous warlord, Lord Rajasena, who murdered his mother, had his father killed, and has an entire army protecting him.

The film begins in 1431 feudal Siam. It is a time of political upheaval, treachery and danger. The opening scene explains how during the reign of Boromarajatiraj II of the Ayutthaya Kingdom, the Ayutthaya royal court became more powerful than the Sukhothai kingdom and expanded to the east. The Ayutthaya army besieged the Kingdom of Gods for several months. The king sent his son, Prince Indraracha to rule the kingdom.

At the new kingdom, Lord Sihadecho is a provincial ruler, and a gallant and noble warrior of a formally great dynasty. His son, Tien, a spirited and unyielding youth, aspires to be just like his father, but is forced to undergo dance lessons instead much to his disdain. Meanwhile, the treacherous and power-craving Lord Rajasena, a former city administrator of the capital city, plots to seize total control of all Asia and has amassed the greatest army in Asia. Rajasena sends out vicious assassins to murder Lord Sihadecho’s family and his loyal soldiers. The only survivor from this massacre is Tien, who manages to escape with deep vengeance in his heart.

Tien is captured by a group of savage slave traders, who throw him into a pit with a giant crocodile when he proves uncontrollable. Tien is saved by Chernang (Sorapong Chatree), leader of the renowned “Pha Beek Khrut” (Garuda Wing Cliff) guerilla group, who attack the slave traders. Chernang throws a knife to Tien, proclaiming “your life depends on you, young boy,” with which Tien kills the crocodile. Intrigued by his physical prowess and attitude, Chernang takes Tien to a soothsayer, who says the boy has a great destiny, that “spirits will fear him” and that he will become the greatest warrior who will ever live, and as such Chernang takes in Tien as his adoptive son and raises him like himself as a guerilla and a bandit. Tien gets his wish to train as a warrior and more besides, growing up to excel in the arts of war, including man-to-man fighting, incantation, and subterfuge. Tien is instructed in a variety of traditional Asian fighting styles, including muay boran and krabi krabong, Japanese kenjutsu and ninjutsu, Malay silat, and various Chinese martial arts. He also learns the use of weapons such as the ninjatō, katana, jian, dao, talwar, nunchaku, rope dart, and three-section staff.

Now a young man and with all these martial arts heavily instilled, becoming the greatest warrior to ever live, Tien (Tony Jaa) is eager to quench the vengeance in his heart by killing the slave traders, which he does. He then goes on to kill Lord Rajasena by posing as a dancer during a celebration. Returning to the Pha Beek Khrut, Tien is mystified to find their village deserted. Suddenly, he finds himself confronted by wave after wave of masked assassins, the same ones hired by Lord Rajasena to destroy his original home. As the fight progresses Tien is too enraged to notice that the masked villains are none other than his Pha Beek Khrut comrades though their individual combat styles are glaringly recognizable. As Tien tries to defeat the masked assassins he climbs on an elephant but then Bhuti Sangkha a.k.a. The Crow Ghost (Dan Chupong uncredited) appears and kicks Tien off of the elephant. Bhuti’s nature is unknown and he has a small role in the film. Then he takes the elephant away. At last confronting their leader, Tien finds they have been surrounded by Rajasena’s army, which is led by the tyrant, himself. Lord Rajasena reveals he had survived thanks to an armored tunic concealed beneath his state robes. Chernang unmasks and admits to his part in killing Lord Sihadecho, as he was in league with Rajasena. Chernang explains that he must carry out Rajasena’s orders, or his family (the Pha Beek Khrut) will be killed. As Tien reluctantly fights Chernang, Chernang pins him to the ground, once again calls Tien his son and asks him to take his life in payment for killing his father. Chernang then forces Tien’s blade to snap and slash across his throat, taking his life.

The film ends on a cliffhanger with Tien, after defeating dozens of Rajasena’s warriors, being finally overwhelmed by hundreds more. Rajasena orders Tien to be taken away to be slowly tortured to death. It is unclear whether Tien survives, and if he does, how it is so. An extremely ambiguous and vague voice-over explains that Tien “may find a way to cheat death again”, and shows him with a fully-grown beard (which he does not have in the film) standing in front of a scarred golden Buddha statue, perhaps indicating reincarnation.


Ong-Bak 3 (Thai) is a 2010 Thai martial arts film directed, produced and written by Tony Jaa and Panna Rittikrai. The film’s story is a follow-up to Ong Bak 2, where Tien (Tony Jaa) is put to be brutally beaten by Lord Rajasena (Sarunyu Wongkrajang)’s men. He is helped to recover by Master Bua (Nirut Sirijanya), and when Tien returns to his village, he finds it taken over by Bhuti Sangkha (Dan Chupong).

In the year 1431 in Thailand, Tien (Tony Jaa) is held captive being beaten with wooden staves. On the orders of Lord Rajasena (Sarunyu Wongkrajang), his elbows and knees are snapped. As Lord Rajasena sleeps, Tien’s guerilla fighters attempt to free Tien, but Bhuti Sangkha (Dan Chupong) appears and kills them. Lord Rajasena offers to hire Bhuti, but he refuses and gives the offer to remove the curse which has been placed on Rajasena before leaving. Rajasena orders his men to kill Tien, but before this can be carried out, a man arrives with a pardon from the king, indicating that he will take Tien, much to Rajasena’s ire. The messenger returns Tien to the Kana Khone villagers. After fending off the village from invaders who are after Tien, Master Bua (Nirut Sirijanya) feels guilty over Tien’s imprisonment and becomes a Buddhist monk. Pim (Primrata Det-Udom) heals Tien to life, but finds that Tien is still crippled from his beatings. Tien then embarks on a rehabilitation regimen with the help of Master Bua.

Rajasena visits Bhuti at his temple to remove his curse, but Bhuti reveals his true motive of usurping Rajasena and becoming the new king. After a battle, Bhuti decapitates Rajasena, but his severed head curses Bhuti. After meditating, Tien returns to his village to find it in ruins, and the surviving villagers kidnapped and enslaved by Bhuti. Bhuti uses his magic to summon an eclipse. When Pim reveals herself as Tien’s companion, she is taken to Bhuti’s palace, where she is killed. Tien witnesses this killing from a statue and fights his way through the guards before confronting Bhuti, who launches a spear at Tien’s chest. As he falls to his knees, defeated, he remembers Bua’s words, and finds himself again atop the statue. Overcoming Bhuti’s illusion, lightning strikes and Bhuti’s eclipse magic is dispelled. Bhuti attempts to escape but is confronted by Tien. Bhuti attempts again to throw a spear at Tien, who catches and throws it aside. On the royal ledge above the arena, Tien’s upright finger tips hold Bhuti aloft by his chin. Suddenly an elephant’s trunk butts the doors below the ledge, causing Bhuti to fall from Tien’s grasp. Bhuti falls, over the elephant’s tusks. The camera pans as we watch Bhuti dying on the ground, pierced by the elephant’s broken tusk. As he breaths his last breath, the elephant, now resembling the one tusk Ganesha, raises his head in a victorious trumpet. Beginning life anew, with good having triumphed over evil, the final scene opens as Tien, Pim and the remaining villagers, pray before the statue of Ong Bak.

Afro Samurai: The Complete Murder Sessions [Blu-ray] Samuel Jackson (Actor), Mark Hamill (Actor), Fuminori Kizaki (Director). In a feudal yet futuristic Japan, it is said that the one who wields the Number 1 headband is the fiercest fighter in the world and shall possess god-like powers. The only way to obtain the Number 1 headband is to challenge and defeat the current wearer in combat. However, only the Number 2 can challenge the Number 1 whereas anyone can challenge the Number 2. Thus, whoever wears the Number 2 headband risks constant attack. Justice, owner of the Number 2 headband, fights and kills Rokutaro (Afro’s father and owner of the Number 1 headband). Afro Samurai witnesses the fight and vows revenge against Justice, who tells him to seek him out when he is “ready to face a god.”

Years later, Afro is the Number 2 master swordsman. He kills the Empty Seven Clan and various assassins, recalls his past memory and goes to Mount Shumi. He also confronts his vengeful childhood friend Jinno. Afro discovers that there are other headbands in existence, ranging to an unspecified higher number and sees that the corpses of those who wore them are skewered throughout Justice’s safe house. Afro kills Justice and takes the Number 1 headband, and all of the headbands disappear. Afro returns and lives in the mountains to confront Jinno, who is adorned with every headband in existence and seeking revenge.

However, the story changes in Afro Samurai: Resurrection, when Jinno takes Rokutaro’s corpse, while Jinno’s sister Sio takes the Number 1 headband and asks Afro to find the Number 2. After taking the headband from Shichigoro, Afro confronts the resurrected Rokutaro, who kills Jinno and Sio. Afro defeats Rokutaro, gives the Number 2 headband to Kotaro and continues to wear the Number 1.

The Black Cauldron: 25th Anniversary Special Edition Grant Bardsley (Actor), John Byner (Actor), Ted Berman (Director, Writer).

In the land of Prydain, Taran is an “assistant pig-keeper” on the small farm of Caer Dallben, home of Dallben the Enchanter. Dallben learns that the Horned King is searching for a mystical relic known as the Black Cauldron, which is capable of creating an invincible army of undead warriors, the “Cauldron-Born”. Dallben fears the Horned King may try to steal his pig Hen Wen, which has oracular powers, and use her to locate the cauldron. Dallben directs Taran to take Hen Wen to safety; unfortunately, Taran’s foolish daydreaming causes Hen Wen to be captured by the Horned King’s forces.

Taran follows them to the Horned King’s stronghold. Along the way, he encounters the small, pestering companion Gurgi, who joins Taran on his search. Frustrated by Gurgi’s antics, Taran leaves the former to sneak into the castle and rescues Hen Wen, but although Hen Wen escapes from the castle, Taran is arrested and thrown into the dungeon. A fellow captive named Princess Eilonwy frees Taran as she is trying to make her own escape. In the catacombs beneath the castle, Taran and Eilonwy discover the ancient burial chamber of a king, where Taran arms himself with the king’s sword. It contains magic that allows him effectively to fight the Horned King’s minions and so to fulfill his dream of heroism. Along with a third prisoner, the comical, middle-aged bard Fflewddur Fflam, they escape from the castle and are soon reunited with Gurgi. Upon discovering that Taran has escaped, the Horned King orders his dwarf companion Creeper to send the Gwythaints to follow Taran and bring him back alive.

Following Hen Wen’s trail, the four stumble into the underground kingdom of the Fair Folk who reveal that Hen Wen is under their protection. When the cheerful, elderly King Eiddileg reveals that he knows where the cauldron is, Taran resolves to go destroy it himself. Eilonwy, Fflewddur, and Gurgi agree to join him and Eiddileg’s obnoxious right-hand man Doli is assigned to lead them to the Marshes of Morva while the Fair Folk agree to escort Hen Wen safely back to Caer Dallben. At the marshes they learn that the cauldron is held by three witches—the grasping Orddu, who acts as leader; the greedy Orgoch; and the more benevolent Orwen, who falls in love with Fflewddur at first sight, which causes a frightened Doli to abandon the group. Orddu agrees to trade the cauldron for Taran’s sword, and he reluctantly agrees, although he knows that to yield it will cost his chance for heroism. Before vanishing, the witches reveal that the cauldron is indestructible, and that its power can only be broken by someone who climbs in under his own free will, which will kill him. Although Taran feels foolish for aspiring to destroy the cauldron alone, his companions show their belief in him; and it seems that Eilonwy and Taran will kiss. Suddenly, the celebration is interrupted by the Horned King’s soldiers who have finally reached the marshes themselves. They seize the cauldron and arrest everyone but Gurgi, and take their prisoners back to the castle. The Horned King uses the cauldron to raise the dead and his Cauldron-born army begins to pour out into the world.

Gurgi manages to free the captives and Taran decides to cast himself into the cauldron, but Gurgi stops him and jumps into the cauldron himself. The undead army collapses. When the Horned King spots Taran at large, he infers the turn of events and saying that Taran has interfered for the last time, throws the youth toward the cauldron; however, the cauldron’s magic is out of control. It consumes the Horned King in a tunnel of fire and blood, as well as destroying the castle, using up all its powers forever. The three witches come to recover the now-inert Black Cauldron. However, Taran has finally realized Gurgi’s true friendship, and he persuades them to revive the wild thing in exchange for the cauldron, forcing him to give up his magical sword permanently. Fflewddur challenges the reluctant witches to demonstrate their powers by the revival, and upon hearing Fflewddur’s remarks, the witches honor the request, restoring Gurgi back to life. The four friends then journey back to Caer Dallben where Dallben and Doli watch them in a vision created by Hen Wen, and Dallben finally praises Taran for his heroism despite the fact that he prefers to be a Pig-Boy.

The Black Cauldron (1965) Novel. The series was inspired by Welsh mythology and by the castles, scenery, and language of Wales, which the author experienced during World War II combat intelligence training.

The story opens at Caer Dallben where Dallben the enchanter and Coll the farmer and retired warrior have raised the orphan Taran from infancy. It is early autumn more than a year after the defeat of Arawn’s army and death of his warlord the Horned King which ended The Book of Three. Taran has returned more or less contentedly to farming and studying under the tutelage of his mentors. However, weightier matters are afoot.

Prince Gwydion has called allies to a council hosted by Dallben. Men are disappearing and more and more of the undead Cauldron-Born have joined the forces of Arawn the Death Lord. Evidently the Black Cauldron is active: Gwydion proposes to capture it. King Morgant of the kingdom of Madoc will lead the main force in an attack on Annuvin after a smaller raiding party led by Gwydion has broken off to enter by a mountain pass known only to Coll. If all goes as planned, Gwydion’s party will slip into Arawn’s stronghold and steal the Cauldron without being detected. Three men have been designated to remain behind with pack animals to serve as a rearguard and secure the retreat: Adaon, the warrior son of chief bard Taliesin; Taran; and Ellidyr Prince of Pen-Llarcau, who is arrogant, wiry, strong, and threadbare. Ellidyr disdains Taran for his place on the farm and his unknown parentage. Taran envies Ellidyr for his noble birth, despite Dallben’s counsel that that youngest son of a minor king has only “his name and his sword”. Both are dismayed to share a role with no chance for glory.

Leaving aside the feud between the two youths, all goes smoothly until Gwydion’s raiders find that the Cauldron has disappeared. That company rejoins the rearguard in haste because the Huntsmen of Annuvin have been deployed. Meanwhile, the uninvited Princess Eilonwy and man/beast Gurgi have caught up with the quest from behind. Gwydion and Coll are split off from the party but, thanks to Doli of the Fair Folk, all others find refuge underground in a Fair Folk waypost maintained by Gwystyl. From Gwystyl and his pet crow Kaw, they learn that the Cauldron has been stolen by the three witches Orddu, Orwen and Orgoch, who reside in the bleak Marshes of Morva.

When they depart the waypost, Ellidyr rides southward, determined to retrieve the Cauldron single-handedly. With the Huntsmen abroad, Adaon leads the others in pursuit: Taran, Eilonwy, Gurgi, Doli, and the wandering bard Fflewddur Fflam. When they are attacked and scattered, Adaon is mortally wounded and Taran inherits his brooch, whose gift and burden is prophetic dreams and visions. With its guidance, he gathers and leads all but Doli toward the Marshes. From the fringe he both guides his small party through the Marshes to temporary safety and leads a pursuing band of Huntsmen to their deaths.

Orddu and her sisters explain that Arawn once paid them a great price to borrow the Cauldron; they retrieved it only when he held it beyond the agreed-upon time. In their way, they welcome friends of “Little Dallben”, but they refuse to give up the Cauldron unless they accept the offer in exchange for something of (in their judgment) equivalent value. Thus, they refuse the offer of Gurgi’s wallet with its inexhaustible supply of food, Eilonwy’s magical bauble, or Flewddur’s falsehood-detecting harp. Having had the offer of his sword and horse refused, Taran is compelled to barter the brooch of Adaon. The companions then try to destroy “their” Cauldron but learn from the witches that can be achieved only by a living person who knowingly and willingly climbs in to die. Horrified, the questors resolve to take the Cauldron to Dallben to seek an alternative solution.

At the ford of the river Tevyn, the heavy and cumbersome Cauldron sinks into the riverbed. Ellidyr arrives and offers to help extricate the Cauldron if the others will credit him for the whole enterprise. Taran agrees, yet Ellidyr rides off with the Cauldron alone when they have freed it. Soon the companions meet the army of Morgant, who welcomes them. Unfortunately, he is a traitor. In Morgant’s camp they see Ellidyr beaten and bound, and the Cauldron waiting to generate Morgant’s own undead legion. He offers to spare the companions’ lives if Taran will enter personal service. Later, Doli arrives invisibly and cuts everyone’s bonds. Ellidyr determines to rush the Cauldron and make the sacrifice himself. Although wounded, he is able to force himself into the opening and the Cauldron shatters.

Gwydion, King Smoit, and his army defeat Morgant in battle. The story closes as Taran, Eilonwy, and Gurgi take leave of Gwydion at the verge of Caer Dallben.

Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust [Blu-ray] Andy Philpot (Actor), John Rafter Lee (Actor), Yoshiaki Kawajiri (Director).

Charlotte, a young woman, is abducted by Baron Meier Link, a vampire nobleman who is known not to harm humans needlessly. Charlotte’s father, Elbourne, hires D, a dhampir, to find her and rescue her, and alternatively, kill her humanely if she’s been turned into a vampire. He offers D $500,000 as a down payment, and offers him $10mil if he carries out the job. D has Elbourne double the payment, and agrees to search for Charlotte.

At the same time, Charlotte’s older brother hires another group of vampire hunters, the notorious Marcus brothers, composed of the leader Borgoff, a hulking man named Nolt, a blade master named Kyle, a physically disabled psychic named Grove and a woman named Leila who hunts vampires because of a personal grudge rather than for monetary gain. The two parties (D and the Marcus brothers) race inexorably after Meier Link. However, Meier Link hires the mutant Barbarois; a group of lethal mercenary body guards. They consist of Caroline, a shape shifter; Benge, a shadow manipulator; and Machira, a werewolf.

Throughout the course of the film, two of the Marcus brothers, Nolt and Kyle, end up being killed by the mutant Barbarois, while Leila and Borgoff continue their search for Charlotte.

As the story progresses, Meier Link’s abduction of Charlotte turns out to not be as it seemed, as it’s revealed that Charlotte willingly ran away with Meier Link as his lover. Charlotte rightfully feared that no one would understand their relationship, with her a human and Link a vampire.

Throughout their search, and after both characters save each other from seeming death at separate points, D has a conversation with Leila, where she reveals that she hunts vampires because a vampire killed her mother. D tells her that he hunts vampires as he has no other choice as a dhampir, and she can have a life that someone like him could never have; the life of a normal human. Leila, having not exactly taken the life of a normal human, instead being a monster hunter, fears that no one will mourn her death when that time comes. She make a pact with D, that if either one of them survives, the survivor will bring flowers to the other’s grave. D admits that he does not expect himself to survive the bounty hunt, after coming so close to death.

In the final act of the film, Meier Link transports Charlotte in his carriage to the Castle of Chaythe, where Countess Carmilla, Meier Link’s matron, waits for them. Carmilla, a ghost of a vampire who died long ago, reigned supreme within the Castle of Chaythe when vampires were all-powerful and unchallenged. However, her bloodlust was so strong that D’s father, an ancient, noble vampire king, killed her in disgust. Carmilla promises Meier Link and Charlotte travel to a far away city known as the City of The Night, where they can be free to love each other, which they will travel to in a large and ancient spaceship-like structure hidden beneath the Castle of Chaythe. Carmilla explains that most ancient castles had similar ships hidden within them, and that back when vampires reigned supreme, these ships weren’t an uncommon means for vampires to travel to far regions. Carmilla notes that the ship is old and hasn’t flown in a long time, and that she doesn’t know if the ship will fly safely, but that Meier Link and Charlotte are allowed to take that risk, if they so wish.

D and the remaining Marcus brothers separately trail Meier Link to the Castle of Chaythe, and as they enter the castle in their search for Charlotte, Carmilla plays psychological tricks on them. Borgoff, for example, is shown Nolt and Kyle, the dead members of the Marcus brothers, returning to life. Borgoff ends up also being killed in his surprised and ecstatic state by Carmilla’s ghost, and it turns out Nolt and Kyle never returned to life at all. This leaves Leila as the only surviving member of the Marcus brothers as she continues her search for Charlotte inside the castle.

Carmilla manipulates D’s mind, and shows him a vision of his mother, in which she apologizes to D for birthing him as a dhampir, and states that she couldn’t help it as she was a human in love with D’s vampire father, and attempts to explain that humans are capable of loving vampires. D strikes this vision of his mother down with his sword and returns to a normal state.

In a plot twist, Carmilla turns on Meier Link and Charlotte, as Carmilla had actually plotted to kill Charlotte all along, with the reasoning being that Carmilla needed the blood of a virgin to leave her ghostly, ethereal form and return to life. D destroys Carmilla’s ghost just as Carmilla is performing the ritual and draining Charlotte of her blood. D, still with a job to do in bringing Charlotte safely back home, engages Meier Link in battle, as Meier Link doesn’t want D to take his lover away from him. D stabs Meier Link through the chest with his sword, but not through his heart, injuring Meier Link but allowing him to live. During their encounter, Charlotte has died due to the ritual that Carmilla had been performing previously, and D takes the ring off of her finger as proof of her death to bring back to Elbourne, as he ceases battle with Meier Link.

D, along with Leila, make their leave of the Castle of Chaythe, and allow Meier Link to leave for the City of the Night in the Castle of Chaythe’s ship with Charlotte’s corpse on board. D and Leila agree to ride back into town together on D’s horse, as Leila jokingly tells D that the reward is rightfully hers, but this time, she’ll allow him to have it. Before riding off, they watch in the distance as the ship hidden underneath the castle takes off to the skies with Charlotte’s corpse and Meier Link inside.

In the final scene of the movie, D arrives at Leila’s funeral, watching her loved ones mourn from a distance. Many decades have passed since all of the previous events, as a little girl revealed to be Leila’s granddaughter approaches and greets D, and invites him to stay with her family for a while. D politely declines, saying that he simply came to “repay a favor to an old friend, who feared no one would mourn her death.” D admits that he was glad she was wrong. The girl thanks him, and D replies by smiling gently at her, and leaves.

Gods and Mortals: Eleven Novels Featuring Thor, Loki, Greek Gods, Native American Spirits, Vampires, Werewolves, & More Kindle Edition. 

Unsung Hero Black Inventor

Crest Toothpaste, Folgers Coffee, Bounce Fabric Softener and Safeguard Soap were all created by an African-American Man

Did you know that Crest Toothpaste, Folgers Coffee, Bounce Fabric Softener and Safeguard Soap were all created by an African-American Man? I have talked about Dr. Herbert Smitherman Sr. before on The African History Network Show before. In… 2011 I spoke at an 8th grade graduation and told the audience about him to show them their potential. Most of the audience including parents had never heard of him and were amazed by his story.

Dr. Herbert Smitherman was a pioneering executive and professional chemist at Procter & Gamble who led the way for other African-Americans at the prestigious company in the 1960s. He was the first black person with a doctorate hired at Procter & Gamble.

With a Ph.D in physical organic chemistry, Dr. Smitherman developed a number of incredibly popular patents, including Crest toothpaste, Safeguard soap, Bounce fabric softeners, Biz, Folgers Coffee and Crush soda, to name a few. Not only are they still on the shelves, but many of them are on display at the Cincinnati Museum Center in the featured exhibit, “America I AM: The African-American Imprint.”

Nicknamed the “Jackie Robinson of Procter & Gamble,” Dr. Smitherman spent 29 years there before turning in his labcoat to work as a professor at Wilberforce University. But after serving at the historically black college, Smitherman turned his attention to starting a high school called the Western Hills Design Technology School to help black students perform better in math and science.

A child of the south, Dr. Smitherman’s family lived in Birmingham, Alabama, where his father served as a reverend. A young Smitherman would see his father’s church burn down twice during their push for voting registration and voting rights.

He died on Oct. 9, 2010.

Read more here: http://blackhistorymonth.blackamericaweb.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=562%3Adr-herbert-smitherman&catid=112%3Ageneral&Itemid=292

http://cincinnatiherald.our-hometown.com/news/2010-10-16/Front_Page/Dr_Herbert_C_Smitherman_Sr_broke_barriers_at_PG_wa.html

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Listen to The African History Network Show with host Michael Imhotep as we interview some of our top Scholars on African History and much more every Thurs, 8pm-11pm EST at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/theafricanhistorynetworkshow or www.TheAfricanHistoryNetwork.com by phone, when we are LIVE at (914) 338-1375. Episodes are also archived on www.Itunes.com.

Listen to “The Per Ankh Hour Q & A Show” with Prof. Kaba Kamene (aka Booker T. Coleman) of “Hidden Colors 1 & 2” and Michael Imhotep of The African History Network Wendesdays 10:00pm-11:30pm EST at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/theafricanhistorynetworkshow or www.TheAfricanHistoryNetwork.com or by phone LIVE at (914) 338-1375. Call in with your questions. Archived episodes are also available for you to listen to as well. See More

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